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Friday, 6 July 2012

BLOG TOUR!! The Secrets of the Vanmars by Elisabeth Wheatley

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At the Other End:

After her adventures with the Key of Amatahns, sixteen-year-old Janir Caersynn Argetallam returns home to find Brevia on the brink of war with a neighboring country, Stlaven. Her foster-father and even Saoven—a brave young elf warrior—think it will be safe at the castle where Janir grew up. However, while trying to unravel a looming mystery, Karile—self-taught wizard and Janir’s self-appointed best friend—becomes certain that there is danger in the mountains surrounding Janir’s childhood home and that it has something to do with Stlaven’s most powerful family, the Vanmars...







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Author Bio...

 Elisabeth Wheatley started writing short stories when she was as young as seven years old. She began working on what would eventually become The Key of Amatahns when she was eleven. The story went through countless total rewrites until Elisabeth began working on what would be the final version when she was fourteen. When she completed the draft at fifteen, her parents (being supportive) sent her manuscript to a professional editor in West Texas. The editor, Suzanne O'Bryan, was so impressed with Elisabeth's work that she recommended it to a friend at a small publishing house, Chengalera Press. Chengalera Press was also very impressed and wanted to publish the manuscript. The Key of Amatahns was reviewed and edited by Professor Emeritus of the English Department at Southwestern University, Dr. T. Walt Herbert. The Kindle version of The Key of Amatahns was released on June 30, 2011, when Elisabeth was still fifteen. The paper version followed days later. Elisabeth is currently working on the second and third installments in the Argetallam Saga, while continuing to attend high school in the Texas Hill Country. Her hobbies include beekeeping, cheesemaking, mythology, and studying American Sign Language.



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How I Handle Writer's Block

How I handle writer’s block...in truth, I don’t handle it very well. I pace, mumble like a psych ward patient, and glare unkind thoughts at my blank computer screen. Sometimes I smother my writer’s block sorrows in massive quantities of dark chocolate, other times I go on a walk with my dogs to release some of the pent-up frustration.

Way back (two years ago) when I started writing The Key of Amatahns, my story was an amusement, a plaything. Getting writer’s block was no big deal because there was no pressure, even from myself. Now the tables have turned and I am always chafing to feel productive (not necessarily be productive, just maintain the illusion).

Some days, my story screams to be written, bouncing around inside my head like a self-powered ping pong ball, demanding to get onto the page. Those days are the ones when writing is easy. And I have them about...once a year. Most days I have the idea and I can put it on paper with a little effort. Then there are the days when writing is a challenge, but I can still do it if I focus. And then we have the writer’s block days. On the writer’s block days, I can focus all I want, I can get mad all I want, I can scream all I want, the story just won’t happen.

When I get a writer’s block day, my mind wanders everywhere except my writing. I usually know where I want the story to go, I just don’t know how to get there or how to move forward.

After I finish a book I usually get burn-out for a little while and that’s okay because I just finished a book and there’s no hurry for the next one at that point. I read unhealthy amounts of YA Fantasy and, when I can find good specimens, YA Sci-Fi. I come up with innumerable story ideas that usually have nothing to do with what’s lined up for me to work on next. The lulls in my writing are usually peaceful, if a little empty. Sort of like a house when all the kids have gone to summer camp.

When I have writer’s block and I need to write because of a deadline, then it usually helps if I plan everything out ahead of time. But knowing where I’m supposed to go doesn’t always help and it works best if I have an actual scene envisioned. Having an idea of what I want to happen in an upcoming scene that I haven’t reached, helps me craft my story to get there and once I do, writing that scene is easy—normally.

In short, writer’s block is something  I can get around some days and sometimes I can’t. Like red lights, the flu, hangnails, or power outages, writer’s block is one of those things that doesn’t last forever, but in the end, to some extent or other, I still have to endure it until it passes.



 
~ Elisabeth Wheatley




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